How Much Weight Should You Be Lifting?

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Client Question: “How heavy should I going with my weights?”

Coaches Long-Winded Answer: “I think you should pick whatever weights allow you to keep proper form and technique, complete the specified number of repetitions while challenging yourself. Oh and don’t work to failure. You should always have a little energy left in the tank”

In my experience, I’ve found that people get the best results from working on all sides of the repetition spectrum. This means performing heavier weight for lower repetitions and lighter weight for higher repetitions.

How often we perform a certain amount of repetitions or how heavy we go is most times dependent on the client’s goal.

Before you read on, it’s important to know that building strength is crucial. Strength is the number 1 prerequisite for any goal. Strength allows you to get the most out of your workouts. That’s not an opinion but a fact.

Power- the muscles ability to exert force as quickly as possible  Strength- the muscle’s ability to exert force on an external object  Hypertrophy- the development of lean muscle tissue  Endurance- the ability of the muscle to repeatedly exert submaximal force

Power- the muscles ability to exert force as quickly as possible

Strength- the muscle’s ability to exert force on an external object

Hypertrophy- the development of lean muscle tissue

Endurance- the ability of the muscle to repeatedly exert submaximal force

For females, I’ve found that working more in the 8 - 15 repetition range gives them the best results. This allow for them to work to build lean muscle tissue while also improving muscular endurance.

For males, I’ve found that working between 5 - 12 repetition range gives them the best results. However, going over 12 reps for a few single joint exercises (i.e. shoulders, triceps, biceps) is also effective.

*This doesn’t mean that I never go outside these ranges. In fact, I’m extremely proud of some of our members especially our female ones who aren’t afraid to go below 8 reps and lift heavier.

The point I’m trying to make that in order to see the best results, it’s crucial that you work within all repetition ranges.

How heavy should you go?

Let’s go back to the answer.

If I’m tasked to do something for 8 repetitions, don’t choose a weight that you can do for 15 or 20 reps. Then the weight is too light and you won’t get much out of it. On the other hand, don’t choose a weight that you can barely do for 8 reps or even worse, you struggle with your technique and form in order to get there.

There is an inherent risk involved with any sort of physical activity and weight training is no different. So when choosing a weight, lower your risk of injury by performing the repetitions with great technique to get the most out of the exercise while keeping yourself safe.

Cornell

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About Me:

I own and operate a
fitness studio in
Fairfield, New Jersey. With
this, I've been blessed to
work with clients from all walks of life.

This experience has given
me opportunities to help
people reach their goals. Whether it be fat loss, athletic performance, muscle gain, or just moving without pain, I've worked with them all.

If you would like to know more about my programs and interested in working with me, I can be reached at my email provided below.

also make sure to visit my site, Cornellhunt.com or my studio website at HuntforStrength.com.

Contact:

(C) 732-558-0901

(E) CornellDHunt@Gmail.com

Cornell HuntComment